The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2013-2014 Season:
Animal Crackers
Dance of the Holy Ghosts
A Civil War Christmas
Stones in His Pockets
Twelfth Night
Vanya Sonya Masha and Spike
Wild with Happy
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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the central paradox of theater is that something which starts off complete, as true to itself, as self-contained and as subjective as a sonnet, is then thrown into a kind of spin dryer which is the process of staging the play; and that process is hilariously empirical Tom Stoppard, “Pragmatic Theatre,” Sept 23, 1999
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/1999/sep/23/pragmatic-theater/


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nprmusic:

Liked our crazy Tiny Desk Concert with OK Go? Want to help us win a Webby Award?

(via npr)



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We’ve told people that avant-garde theater is not for everybody. We could do more of what the fashion industry does—they make avant-garde fashion something you want to see. You may not want to wear it, but you want to see it and experience it. So if theater could figure out a way to convince people that unconventional forms are exciting. “Oh you might get bored by this? That’s exciting!” The idea that the play or the performance is supposed to solve everything for you in the moment is insidious. No, it’s supposed to offer you a conversation—after. To me, performance is about inspiring people to do things. The time that you’re sitting in the theater is about giving you context for what you’re going to do after—it’s not the thing. I think that’s all theater artists really do. Taylor Mac, in this interview in BOMB Magazine (via itsdlevy)

(via dramaturgytea)



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everythingscenic:

Dance of the Holy Ghosts. Neil Patel.


Center Stage revival, 2013dir. Kwame Kwei-Armah

everythingscenic:

Dance of the Holy Ghosts. Neil Patel.

Center Stage revival, 2013
dir. Kwame Kwei-Armah

(via upstages)



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upstages:

dramaturgytea:

'Let me just look up this one fact.'

#DramaturgProblems

indeed…

upstages:

dramaturgytea:

'Let me just look up this one fact.'

#DramaturgProblems

indeed…



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Anyone who wears a tiara and sequins is always going to be the winner. Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike (via fuckyeahgreatplays)


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be-human-no-more:

Необъяснимая штука — душа.
Никто не знает, где находится, но все знают, как болит.

Антон Чехов

a little Chekhov gallery



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fjolsvior:

[Anton Chekhov, 1901]

Anton Chekhov. Apropos of kicking off Durang’s VANYA & SONIA & MASHA & SPIKE, shortly.

fjolsvior:

[Anton Chekhov, 1901]

Anton Chekhov. Apropos of kicking off Durang’s VANYA & SONIA & MASHA & SPIKE, shortly.



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idlesuperstar:

Chekhov reading The Seagull to the company of the Moscow Arts Theatre

now that is a first read-through!

idlesuperstar:

Chekhov reading The Seagull to the company of the Moscow Arts Theatre

now that is a first read-through!



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the-library-and-step-on-it:

LITERATURE MEME:
Four Tropes: Chekhov’s Gun (3/4).

Chekhov’s gun is a metaphor for a dramatic principle concerning simplicity and foreshadowing. It suggests that if one shows a loaded gun on stage in the first act of a play, it should be fired in a later act; otherwise, the gun should not be shown in the first place. The principle was articulated by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov and reported in various forms. 
"Chekhov’s gun" is often used as an example of foreshadowing, with the sight of the gun preparing the audience for its eventual use. But the primary point of Chekhov’s advice was to caution against including unnecessary elements in a story or its staging. Failure to observe the rule of "Chekhov’s gun" may be cited by critics when discussing plot holes. The deliberate defiance of this principle may take the form of a red herring: something which the audience is meant to assume will be important to the plot’s outcome, but ultimately is not.


more insights from Mr Chekhov

the-library-and-step-on-it:

LITERATURE MEME:

Four Tropes: Chekhov’s Gun (3/4).

Chekhov’s gun is a metaphor for a dramatic principle concerning simplicity and foreshadowing. It suggests that if one shows a loaded gun on stage in the first act of a play, it should be fired in a later act; otherwise, the gun should not be shown in the first place. The principle was articulated by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov and reported in various forms.

"Chekhov’s gun" is often used as an example of foreshadowing, with the sight of the gun preparing the audience for its eventual use. But the primary point of Chekhov’s advice was to caution against including unnecessary elements in a story or its staging. Failure to observe the rule of "Chekhov’s gun" may be cited by critics when discussing plot holes. The deliberate defiance of this principle may take the form of a red herring: something which the audience is meant to assume will be important to the plot’s outcome, but ultimately is not.

more insights from Mr Chekhov



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What a fine weather today! Can’t choose whether to drink tea or to hang myself. Anton Chekhov (via linparis)

With Durang’s VANYA & SONIA & MASHA & SPIKE all set to hit the stage in a few days, a cheerful rumination from inspiring source author, Mr A Chekhov.



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thecivilwarparlor:

Petersburg Virginia Surgeons Of The 3rd Division
The American Civil War claimed an appalling number of lives. And while casualties are an unfortunate product of war, it may be surprising to learn that for every man killed in battle, two died from disease. Many of these diseases - dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid and malaria - “were caused by overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the field. Preaching the virtues of clean water, good food and fresh air, the [U. S. Sanitary] Commission pressured the Army Medical Department to ‘improve sanitation, build large well-ventilated hospitals and encourage women to join the newly created nursing corps.’ Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Commission, some 560,000 soldiers died from disease during the war.”
http://americancivilwar.com/sanitary_commision.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Petersburg Virginia Surgeons Of The 3rd Division

The American Civil War claimed an appalling number of lives. And while casualties are an unfortunate product of war, it may be surprising to learn that for every man killed in battle, two died from disease. Many of these diseases - dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid and malaria - “were caused by overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the field. Preaching the virtues of clean water, good food and fresh air, the [U. S. Sanitary] Commission pressured the Army Medical Department to ‘improve sanitation, build large well-ventilated hospitals and encourage women to join the newly created nursing corps.’ Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Commission, some 560,000 soldiers died from disease during the war.”

http://americancivilwar.com/sanitary_commision.html



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thecivilwarparlor:

Recreating Traditional American Music - Rhythm Bones, Banjos, & Fiddles

Carolina Chocolate Drops~

With their 2010 Nonesuch debut, Genuine Negro Jig—which garnered a Best Traditional Folk Album Grammy—the Carolina Chocolate Drops proved that the old-time, fiddle and banjo-based music they’d so scrupulously researched and passionately performed could be a living, breathing, ever-evolving sound. Starting with material culled from the Piedmont region of the Carolinas, they sought to freshly interpret this work, not merely recreate it, highlighting the central role African-Americans played in shaping our nation’s popular music from its beginnings more than a century ago.

The virtuosic trio’s approach was provocative and revelatory. Their concerts, The New York Times declared, were “an end-to-end display of excellence… They dip into styles of southern black music from the 1920s and ’30s—string- band music, jug-band music, fife and drum, early jazz—and beam their curiosity outward. They make short work of their instructive mission and spend their energy on things that require it: flatfoot dancing, jug playing, shouting.”

  • Rolling Stone Magazine described the Carolina Chocolate Drops’ style as “dirt-floor-dance electricity.” If you ask the band, that is what matters most. Yes, banjos and black string musicians first got here on slave ships, but now this is everyone’s music. It’s okay to mix it up and go where the spirit moves.
  • “An appealing grab-bag of antique country, blues, jug band hits and gospel hollers, all given an agreeably downhome production. The Carolina Chocolate Drops are still the most electrifying acoustic act around.” -The Guardian
  • “The Carolina Chocolate Drops are…revisiting, with a joyful vengeance, black string-band and jug-band music of the Twenties and Thirties—the dirt-floor dance electricity of the Mississippi Sheiks and Cannon’s Jug Stompers.” —Rolling Stone

—Michael Hill

http://www.carolinachocolatedrops.com/

Because. Ineffable delight.



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