The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2013-2014 Season:
Animal Crackers
Dance of the Holy Ghosts
A Civil War Christmas
Stones in His Pockets
Twelfth Night
Vanya Sonya Masha and Spike
Wild with Happy
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

-----------------------------------------


Find a beautiful piece of art. If you fall in love with Van Gogh or Matisse or John Oliver Killens, or if you fall love with the music of Coltrane, the music of Aretha Franklin, or the music of Chopin - find some beautiful art and admire it, and realize that that was created by human beings just like you, no more human, no less. Maya Angelou. (via hydeordie)

(via theatrecollage)



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share

Rhetorical beliefs

shitmystudentswrite:

Plato believes that rhetoric is a way to alter the truth while Aristotle believes that rhetoric is an adequate mechanism of communication and a conventional way of finding validity (Yahoo.com: Plato vs. Aristotle par1).  I, on the other hand, believe that rhetoric is just a fancy word for B.S.

hmmm



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share

8 Ways to Build A Dance Audience, Or an Answer for Gina Gibney

sarah-anne:

Gibney Dance Center from Gibney Dance on Vimeo.

The New York Observer’s article about Gina Gibney (<— read it!) is bookended with dancers asking for what they can get.

It opens:

On the night of May 14, a small group of dancers were smoking outside a fundraiser in downtown Manhattan. As they discussed the work of various underappreciated choreographers, attention was suddenly turned to a short redheaded woman who had just exited the event and was walking away. “That’s Gina Gibney?” asked Connor Voss, a startled young dancer. Yes, the group confirmed, it was. Mr. Voss watched Ms. Gibney round the street corner. “Fund me, please?” he said in her direction

and closes with:

The conversation turned, at one point, to contemporary dance’s audience. “How are we going to build a new audience?” Ms. Gibney asked. “It’s not enough to say what artists need in a performance venue—you also have to ask what audiences need.” Indeed, the lack of a devoted audience lurks behind DNA’s collapse and the field’s general insecurity.

For the most part, the dancers at Ms. Gibney’s community forum weren’t interested in discussing this. “I heard there would be some sort of resource center, and that was the most exciting thing to me,” said Alex, a young dancer in attendance. “I didn’t get a sense of what the offerings are … Will these things be free?” Someone else in the audience, prompted by a discussion of the proposed digital media lab, innocently mentioned that her fiancé ran a tech company: “There could be a partnership, definitely.” 

Well, shoot, Gina, I’m with you. If no one there had answers to your question, I sure as heck do.

Read More



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share
newyorker:

Can the “day-and-date” distribution model—whereby movies are released simultaneously in theatres and on video on demand—help indie films succeed? Calum Marsh on the debate: http://nyr.kr/U4AFGd
Photograph: Mark Dye/Star Ledger/Corbis.

newyorker:

Can the “day-and-date” distribution model—whereby movies are released simultaneously in theatres and on video on demand—help indie films succeed? Calum Marsh on the debate: http://nyr.kr/U4AFGd

Photograph: Mark Dye/Star Ledger/Corbis.

(Source: newyorker.com)



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share

samplings from the lobby for Colman Domingo’s WILD WITH HAPPY that recently closed at Baltimore’s Center Stage - including an interactive road-tripping map that invited audiences to share their best & worst travel memories. some real doozies found their way onto green (happy times) or red (road rage) cards.



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share
A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: 1. What am I trying to say? 2. What words will express it? 3. What image or idiom will make it clearer? 4. Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? George Orwell; Politics and the English Language  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: wordpainting, via fledglingflaneuse)



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share


Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share