The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

-----------------------------------------


the—-small:

This 1856 photograph is one of the earliest to depict a phrenologist at work. What’s phrenology? It’s the foundation for many of the principles that are seen in modern psychiatry and neurology today. Phrenologists believed the shape of the brain was an indicator of mental capacity, and that different portions of the brain controlled different parts of the body. Simply by feeling bumps on the skull, a phrenologist would conclude information about a person’s character, intelligence, and whether or not they lacked a certain personality trait.

Poe took quite an interest in this science (maybe because of his characteristically large cranium?) Will his belief in brain bumps lead him into trouble? Come see this October in… 
The Completely Fictional—Utterly True—Final Strange Tale of Edgar Allan Poe

the—-small:

This 1856 photograph is one of the earliest to depict a phrenologist at work. What’s phrenology? It’s the foundation for many of the principles that are seen in modern psychiatry and neurology today. Phrenologists believed the shape of the brain was an indicator of mental capacity, and that different portions of the brain controlled different parts of the body. Simply by feeling bumps on the skull, a phrenologist would conclude information about a person’s character, intelligence, and whether or not they lacked a certain personality trait.

Poe took quite an interest in this science (maybe because of his characteristically large cranium?) Will his belief in brain bumps lead him into trouble? Come see this October in…

The Completely Fictional—Utterly True—Final Strange Tale of Edgar Allan Poe

(via dietpepsicoffeelife)



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share
blog comments powered by Disqus