The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2013-2014 Season:
Animal Crackers
Dance of the Holy Ghosts
A Civil War Christmas
Stones in His Pockets
Twelfth Night
Vanya Sonya Masha and Spike
Wild with Happy
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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Some things, fortunately, do change. But looking back at the moment when Edgar Allan Poe passed back through Charm City long enough to die mysteriously (subject of the next play here at CENTERSTAGE), here is a look at the somewhat gritty reality of 1840s Baltimore:
"In 1848…Baltimore, Maryland was the second-biggest city in the United States. As these period photos show, it was a bustling, busy city. It was also rather grimy and ramshackle. A city like Baltimore was a great place to be—as long as you didn’t mind polluted air, the risk of catching diseases from the water, from refuse in the streets or from one of the many passers-by. It wasn’t necessarily the best place to raise a family.
 (via ROAD TO DESTINY: THE OREGON TRAIL GRAPHIC NOVEL: Baltimore in the 1840s: America’s Second-Largest City)

Some things, fortunately, do change. But looking back at the moment when Edgar Allan Poe passed back through Charm City long enough to die mysteriously (subject of the next play here at CENTERSTAGE), here is a look at the somewhat gritty reality of 1840s Baltimore:

"In 1848…Baltimore, Maryland was the second-biggest city in the United States. As these period photos show, it was a bustling, busy city. It was also rather grimy and ramshackle. A city like Baltimore was a great place to be—as long as you didn’t mind polluted air, the risk of catching diseases from the water, from refuse in the streets or from one of the many passers-by. It wasn’t necessarily the best place to raise a family.

 (via ROAD TO DESTINY: THE OREGON TRAIL GRAPHIC NOVEL: Baltimore in the 1840s: America’s Second-Largest City)



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