The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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In Hidden in this Picture, three cows muster the audacity to wander into a movie shot. The director, understandably enough, throws a conniption fit.
Apparently, Sorkin’s play was partially inspired by an actual on-set conflict with cows. While working Sweet Liberty (film released in 1986), Alan Alda served as writer, director, and an actor; he played a novelist who watches as his work is mutilated and turned into a film riddled with historical inaccuracies. While Alda as director was working on a shot in which a trio of Redcoats on horses emerging over a hill, three cows wandered into view, prompting Alda to a bit of his own spazzing, and the exclamations noted above.
Not as apocalyptic an incident as cows on a Marine base, but there you go.
(The article-excerpt itself is from The New York Times, published August 12, 1985, written by Richard Grenier. Someone mentioned the article. The article was located. And now the article is, in part, here.)

In Hidden in this Picture, three cows muster the audacity to wander into a movie shot. The director, understandably enough, throws a conniption fit.

Apparently, Sorkin’s play was partially inspired by an actual on-set conflict with cows. While working Sweet Liberty (film released in 1986), Alan Alda served as writer, director, and an actor; he played a novelist who watches as his work is mutilated and turned into a film riddled with historical inaccuracies. While Alda as director was working on a shot in which a trio of Redcoats on horses emerging over a hill, three cows wandered into view, prompting Alda to a bit of his own spazzing, and the exclamations noted above.

Not as apocalyptic an incident as cows on a Marine base, but there you go.

(The article-excerpt itself is from The New York Times, published August 12, 1985, written by Richard Grenier. Someone mentioned the article. The article was located. And now the article is, in part, here.)



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