The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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Milky White—now up in Westport, CT for the second leg of the Into the Woods production—visits a local…friend. Break a leg at WCP, Milky!

Milky White—now up in Westport, CT for the second leg of the Into the Woods production—visits a local…friend. Break a leg at WCP, Milky!



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The “Milky” has landed! Milky White arrives at Westport Country Playhouse for 2nd round of her (“his”) engagement in the CENTERSTAGE/WCP co-pro ofInto the Woods. (Love that the arrival includes a tour of the admin offices.)



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The cows are ba-ack…

"Later I read an article in the New York Times, a piece that tickled me. Alan Alda was directing and starring in a movie called Sweet Liberty. […] The whole movie was shot on Long Island. In fact, I think in the Hamptons. And in this movie, they described a moment. They’re going for a very difficult, long exterior shot. They’re shooting something six-hundred feet away, and Michael Caine needs to show up on horseback, and it needs to take place right at magic hour, just as the sun is going down below the horizon. So there isn’t a big window of opportunity to get the shot. You pretty much got one, two, maybe three takes, tops, and you’re cooked, and you’ve got to try it again the next day. And the article was about how Alan Alda really is as nice a guy as everyone says he is, and that the only time this reporter saw him lose it, was trying to get this shot. They had it lined up perfectly, and it was all ready to go, and from out of nowhere, a cow walks into the shot way off into the distance. And Alda starts screaming, ‘Cow! Get out of the shot!’ When the DP leans over and says, ‘You know Alan, don’t worry about it, we can matte it out in post.’ So Alan yells out ‘Alright cow, stay where you are, you’re fine!’ And they got the shot. And reading that article I wrote a one-act play called Hidden in this Picture, about a director trying to get the shot.”

-Aaron Sorkin, in an interview with James L. Longworth (featured in Longworth’s TV Creators: Conversations With America’s Top Producers of Television Drama, Volume 2)



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In Hidden in this Picture, three cows muster the audacity to wander into a movie shot. The director, understandably enough, throws a conniption fit.
Apparently, Sorkin’s play was partially inspired by an actual on-set conflict with cows. While working Sweet Liberty (film released in 1986), Alan Alda served as writer, director, and an actor; he played a novelist who watches as his work is mutilated and turned into a film riddled with historical inaccuracies. While Alda as director was working on a shot in which a trio of Redcoats on horses emerging over a hill, three cows wandered into view, prompting Alda to a bit of his own spazzing, and the exclamations noted above.
Not as apocalyptic an incident as cows on a Marine base, but there you go.
(The article-excerpt itself is from The New York Times, published August 12, 1985, written by Richard Grenier. Someone mentioned the article. The article was located. And now the article is, in part, here.)

In Hidden in this Picture, three cows muster the audacity to wander into a movie shot. The director, understandably enough, throws a conniption fit.

Apparently, Sorkin’s play was partially inspired by an actual on-set conflict with cows. While working Sweet Liberty (film released in 1986), Alan Alda served as writer, director, and an actor; he played a novelist who watches as his work is mutilated and turned into a film riddled with historical inaccuracies. While Alda as director was working on a shot in which a trio of Redcoats on horses emerging over a hill, three cows wandered into view, prompting Alda to a bit of his own spazzing, and the exclamations noted above.

Not as apocalyptic an incident as cows on a Marine base, but there you go.

(The article-excerpt itself is from The New York Times, published August 12, 1985, written by Richard Grenier. Someone mentioned the article. The article was located. And now the article is, in part, here.)



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