The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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mathcat345:

“The Rivals” was a romp and as always, Center Stage folk did an excellent job with staging and costuming.
I did not realize that the term “malapropism” came from this play. The character, Mrs. Malaprop, used so many of them throughout the production that there’s no way I could relay them all to you.
Here is just one of the costumes. The Center Stage website has all sorts of information on the production. I haven’t read my playbill yet, but one of the videos on the site said that the women’s costumes were made by someone in New York who costumes a lot of Broadway productions (“Wicked” was one of them).

mathcat345:

“The Rivals” was a romp and as always, Center Stage folk did an excellent job with staging and costuming.

I did not realize that the term “malapropism” came from this play. The character, Mrs. Malaprop, used so many of them throughout the production that there’s no way I could relay them all to you.

Here is just one of the costumes. The Center Stage website has all sorts of information on the production. I haven’t read my playbill yet, but one of the videos on the site said that the women’s costumes were made by someone in New York who costumes a lot of Broadway productions (“Wicked” was one of them).



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lovely mention for The Rivals (and well-deserved raves for costumes by resident artist David Burdick). show runs to october 30th at centerstage in baltimore. and those butterflies? printed by our own graphics department!
mathcat345:

Mrs. Malaprop had a butterfly theme. In her hair, on her dress, as the border for the wallpaper, and the portrait on her wall was of her in the very same dress.
I am looking forward to the rest of the season. I did thoroughly enjoy today’s performance. Normally, the theater is packed, so I am not certain as to why today’s audience was lacking in numbers.
If you’re in the Baltimore area, Center Stage offers great theater for a reasonable price.
(I am not paid for this endorsement)

lovely mention for The Rivals (and well-deserved raves for costumes by resident artist David Burdick). show runs to october 30th at centerstage in baltimore. and those butterflies? printed by our own graphics department!

mathcat345:

Mrs. Malaprop had a butterfly theme. In her hair, on her dress, as the border for the wallpaper, and the portrait on her wall was of her in the very same dress.

I am looking forward to the rest of the season. I did thoroughly enjoy today’s performance. Normally, the theater is packed, so I am not certain as to why today’s audience was lacking in numbers.

If you’re in the Baltimore area, Center Stage offers great theater for a reasonable price.

(I am not paid for this endorsement)



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Unless you were an English or drama major, chances are you don’t know anything about the sentimental comedies of the 1770s or how playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan took a stand against censorship with his bit of burlesque, “The Rivals,” a comic response to the restrictive Stage Licensing Act of 1737. Never heard of the Stage Licensing Act of 1737? Me neither, until I’d read Production Dramaturg Whitney Egger’s essay in the CENTERSTAGE program (it’s well worth reading; one of the many perks of attending a CENTERSTAGE production). Great shout-out to the Production Dramaturg’s work on this show. At Cross Porpoises: THE RIVALS(Baltimore)


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Tags | The Rivals

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In the late eighteenth century there was a departure from the complicated and often technically difficult danses à deux and a movement toward larger group dances, specifically figure dances called contredanses (also spelled contredances). Usually, but not always, these dances were designed for four couples facing in a square. Feuillet notation, which so beautifully aided dancers in learning the early Baroque dance repertory, was not efficient for notating the larger group dances. Execution of the contredanse (known throughout France as the contredanse francaise) involved dancing a specific sequence of figures. Additional figures, called changes, usually twelve in number, alternated with the main figure of the dance—and the dance concluded when all the changes had been performed. These figure dances, called cotillon in England and the United States, were often performed with two- or four-bar step combinations, as were contredanses. When Marie Antoinette arrived in Paris as queen to Louis XIV in 1774, she brought Viennese dances, including the contredanse allemande. It was performed in much the same manner as the contredanse francaise, except that at least one figure required partners to turn while changing arm positions. Both forms of contredanse were performed in France until the Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century (1789-1799).

Dance Instruction Manuals: Late Eighteenth-Century Social Dance

A little background for Sheridan’s The Rivals (starting rehearsal in September). Courtesy of the Library of Congress.



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