The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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I believe that the magic and power of a story can encourage and fascinate you. In prehistory, outside the cave it was dark, but inside they had a fire and somebody was good at telling stories. Every time I write, I think of the cave. We are one group, outside it’s dark and wolves are howling, but I have a story to tell.

-Haruki Murakami (via wasarahbi)

And AFTER THE QUAKE opens at Rorschach theatre in DC… Serendipitous syncronicity indeed.

(via tonytakitani)



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mohikodaifuku:

Kafka on the Shore

mohikodaifuku:

Kafka on the Shore

(via tonytakitani)



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Life doesn’t require ideals. It requires standards of action. H. Murakami, Norwegian Wood (via talesofromeo)

(via tonytakitani)



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Japanese lore tells of a giant catfish, Namazu, that lives beneath the earth’s surface (or in the mud beneath Japan). Typically, a god/demigod pins Namazu by means of a rather large stone. When the god/demigod is away however, Namazu thrashes about, causing earthquakes and wreaking havoc for those above.

Japanese lore tells of a giant catfish, Namazu, that lives beneath the earth’s surface (or in the mud beneath Japan). Typically, a god/demigod pins Namazu by means of a rather large stone. When the god/demigod is away however, Namazu thrashes about, causing earthquakes and wreaking havoc for those above.



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Check out the following sites for a glance at some of the past, fully staged productions of after the quake:

-Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre mounted the first production (sensible enough as, hey, it was adapted by Steppenwolf ensemble member Frank Galati). Site includes a number of articles, including thoughts from Galati.

-Company One in Boston offers a nifty video (check it out), along with other media and information.

-Berkeley Rep also offers a mix of images and information.



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Now a narrative is a story, not logic, nor ethics, nor philosophy. It is a dream you keep having, whether you realize it or not. Just as surely as you breathe, you go on ceaselessly dreaming your story. And in these stories you wear two faces. You are simultaneously subject and object. You are the whole and you are the part. You are real and you are shadow. ‘Storyteller’ and at the same time ‘character’. It is through such multilayering of roles in our stories that we heal the loneliness of being an isolated individual in the world. Haruki Murakami, in Underground (as quoted in Jay Rubin’s Haruki Murakami and the Music of Words)


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Haruki Murakami addresses a class and reads part of “super-frog saves tokyo” (one of the stories used by Frank Galati in adapting “after the quake”).

To give a quick-glance quote from the clip: “Music means a lot to me. And song, and rhythm, and free improvisation. I learned a lot of things about writing from music.”



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And images after the quake (again with the site).



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Kobe prior to the quake (from the same site).

Kobe prior to the quake (from the same site).



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(from the Kobe University Library Digital Archive)

(from the Kobe University Library Digital Archive)



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To understand something and to put that something into a form you can see with you own eyes are two completely different things. Haruki Murakami, “honey pie” (featured in after the quake)


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