The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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Snapshots in time from 2-day workshop for AT WAR WITH OURSELVES, a secular oratorio composed by Terence Blanchard to a libretto by Nikky Finney, to be performed by the Kronos Quartet and an enormous choir next September (2015) - commemorating the 150th year since the end of the US Civil War. #AWWO @t_blanchard @kronosquartet @TheClariceUMD @andmegansaid



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thecivilwarparlor:

Petersburg Virginia Surgeons Of The 3rd Division
The American Civil War claimed an appalling number of lives. And while casualties are an unfortunate product of war, it may be surprising to learn that for every man killed in battle, two died from disease. Many of these diseases - dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid and malaria - “were caused by overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the field. Preaching the virtues of clean water, good food and fresh air, the [U. S. Sanitary] Commission pressured the Army Medical Department to ‘improve sanitation, build large well-ventilated hospitals and encourage women to join the newly created nursing corps.’ Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Commission, some 560,000 soldiers died from disease during the war.”
http://americancivilwar.com/sanitary_commision.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Petersburg Virginia Surgeons Of The 3rd Division

The American Civil War claimed an appalling number of lives. And while casualties are an unfortunate product of war, it may be surprising to learn that for every man killed in battle, two died from disease. Many of these diseases - dysentery, diarrhea, typhoid and malaria - “were caused by overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the field. Preaching the virtues of clean water, good food and fresh air, the [U. S. Sanitary] Commission pressured the Army Medical Department to ‘improve sanitation, build large well-ventilated hospitals and encourage women to join the newly created nursing corps.’ Despite the efforts of the Sanitary Commission, some 560,000 soldiers died from disease during the war.”

http://americancivilwar.com/sanitary_commision.html



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thecivilwarparlor:

The Banjo And The Civil War- An American Treasure
The banjo and fiddle were the most popular instruments of both player and listener. When the war broke out and the call to arms on both sides was answered, there were literally thousands of banjo pickers, fiddlers, and bones players joining up, both professional and amateurs.
Mr. A. Baur in his series of articles called “Reminiscences of a Banjo Player”, published in the February, 1893, issue of S.S. Stewarts “Banjo and Guitar Journal”. Baur had learned the banjo as a boy in the early 1850s and had joined the Union army early in the war. He writes “…
"In 1864 there very few regiments in the service that had more than one wagon for the whole regiment… Strict orders were at all times issued that no baggage must be carried for an enlisted man in any of the wagons…Where theres a will, theres a way, and a few of us managed with the help of a friendly teamster to stow away a tackhead banjo and an accordion…"
"If the weather was pleasant a crowd would gather around the camp fire, the banjo and accordion having been sneaked out of the wagon and a door from some farm house or a couple of boards having been put on the ground on one side of the fire, the audience would take its place on the opposite side, when the evenings entertainment would be gone through with. It consisted of songs with banjo and accordion accompaniment, stories of home and jig dancing. The performances were crude but helped while away many a lonely hour and remind us of home and friends in the far north."
http://www.drhorsehair.com/war.html

thecivilwarparlor:

The Banjo And The Civil War- An American Treasure

The banjo and fiddle were the most popular instruments of both player and listener. When the war broke out and the call to arms on both sides was answered, there were literally thousands of banjo pickers, fiddlers, and bones players joining up, both professional and amateurs.

Mr. A. Baur in his series of articles called “Reminiscences of a Banjo Player”, published in the February, 1893, issue of S.S. Stewarts “Banjo and Guitar Journal”. Baur had learned the banjo as a boy in the early 1850s and had joined the Union army early in the war. He writes “…

  • "In 1864 there very few regiments in the service that had more than one wagon for the whole regiment… Strict orders were at all times issued that no baggage must be carried for an enlisted man in any of the wagons…Where theres a will, theres a way, and a few of us managed with the help of a friendly teamster to stow away a tackhead banjo and an accordion…"
  • "If the weather was pleasant a crowd would gather around the camp fire, the banjo and accordion having been sneaked out of the wagon and a door from some farm house or a couple of boards having been put on the ground on one side of the fire, the audience would take its place on the opposite side, when the evenings entertainment would be gone through with. It consisted of songs with banjo and accordion accompaniment, stories of home and jig dancing. The performances were crude but helped while away many a lonely hour and remind us of home and friends in the far north."

http://www.drhorsehair.com/war.html



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thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Soldier Joel W. Sweeney - Leader Of The Famous “Virginia Minstrels” Helped Popularize The Banjo Throughout America And Europe. 
The banjo has become the quintessential American musical instrument. It combines the traditions of the simple stringed gourd from African slaves with the ballads and tunes of the Scotch-Irish and English who settled Virginia. Appomattox County was the birthplace of Joel Sweeney, the man who popularized the 5-string banjo.
Credited with adding the banjo’s fifth string, which according to legend was for an instrument he created for his niece between 1831 and 1840. He supposedly added the fifth string because he was “allegedly unhappy with the limited rhythm and melodic variation of the four-string banjos popularly in use.”
Until the 1830s, the banjo was played solely by African Americans. A few musicians performed on stage in “the Louisiana Banjou style” by the middle of the decade, but the instrument used was the Violin. Sweeney began performing with the banjo in the early 1830s. He first performed throughout central Virginia for county court sessions.
Please Note The Origins Of The Banjo In America! 
Eastern Virginia is known to have had slaves who played banjo. President Thomas Jefferson added as a footnote to his Notes on Virginia: “The instrument proper to them [the slaves] is the banjar, which they brought hither from Africa.”
 Bailey, J: “Historical Origin and Stylistic Developments of the Five-String Banjo”, p. 59, The Journal of American Folklore, 1972.
http://kentuckyexplorer.com/nonmembers/01-01023.html

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Soldier Joel W. Sweeney - Leader Of The Famous “Virginia Minstrels” Helped Popularize The Banjo Throughout America And Europe. 

The banjo has become the quintessential American musical instrument. It combines the traditions of the simple stringed gourd from African slaves with the ballads and tunes of the Scotch-Irish and English who settled Virginia. Appomattox County was the birthplace of Joel Sweeney, the man who popularized the 5-string banjo.

Credited with adding the banjo’s fifth string, which according to legend was for an instrument he created for his niece between 1831 and 1840. He supposedly added the fifth string because he was “allegedly unhappy with the limited rhythm and melodic variation of the four-string banjos popularly in use.”

  • Until the 1830s, the banjo was played solely by African AmericansA few musicians performed on stage in “the Louisiana Banjou style” by the middle of the decade, but the instrument used was the Violin. Sweeney began performing with the banjo in the early 1830s. He first performed throughout central Virginia for county court sessions.

Please Note The Origins Of The Banjo In America! 

  • Eastern Virginia is known to have had slaves who played banjo. President Thomas Jefferson added as a footnote to his Notes on Virginia: “The instrument proper to them [the slaves] is the banjar, which they brought hither from Africa.”
  1.  Bailey, J: “Historical Origin and Stylistic Developments of the Five-String Banjo”, p. 59, The Journal of American Folklore, 1972.
  2. http://kentuckyexplorer.com/nonmembers/01-01023.html


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thecivilwarparlor:

”The Bone Player” by William Sidney Mount, 1856

A pair of wooden musical bones

The bones are a Musical Instrument (more specifically, a folk instrument) which, at the simplest, consists of a pair of animal bones, or pieces of wood or a similar material. Sections of large rib bones and lower leg bones are the most commonly used true bones, although wooden sticks shaped like the earlier true bones are now more often used. The technique probably arrived in the U.S. via Irish and other European immigrants, and has a history stretching back to ancient China, Egypt, Greece, and Rome.

Beginning of the Civil War-America in 1860 is enjoying a spirited musical age..

Music is played, sung, and heard everywhere: in the theater houses, in genteel parlors, on street corners, aboard riverboats, in churches and social halls, in slave cabins deep in the heart of the plantation South, on the crooked front porches of Appalachian homesteads, in lessons chanted in rustic schoolrooms, and at the fraternity sings of college chapter houses. They are mostly amateur soldiers, trained for just a few weeks, if at all, before battle. Their average age is 18. They bring into the armies their civilian habits, their hobbies and pastimes, their baseballs and banjos.

Above all, soldiers carry with them their songs.

In North Carolina, mountain boys pick up hand-me-down fiddles or make their own, slipping the dried tail from a timber rattlesnake inside the sound box to dehumidify the precious wood during the warm, rainy months. Farm boys make cigar-box banjos or play the “bones” — a percussion instrument common in minstrel shows carved from the shinbones of oxen or of a hardwood, such as ash or maple.

http://www.ourstate.com/civil-war-songs/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bones_(instrument)



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thecivilwarparlor:

Soldier’s Music
When soldiers North and South marched off to war, they took with them a love of song that transcended the political and philosophical divide between them. Music passed the time; it entertained and comforted; it brought back memories of home and family; it strengthened the bonds between comrades and helped to forge new ones. And, in the case of the Confederacy, it helped create the sense of national identity and unity so necessary to a fledgling nation. Bernard writes, “In camp and hospital they sang — sentimental songs and ballads, comic songs and patriotic numbers….The songs were better than rations or medicine.” By Bernard’s count, “…during the first year [of the war] alone, an estimated two thousand compositions were produced, and by the end of the war more music had been created, played, and sung than during all our other wars combined. More of the music of the era has endured than from any other period in our history.” 
Photo Library of Congress
http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/on-the-homefront/culture/music/music.html
Bernard, Kenneth A., Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War, Caxton Printers, Caldwell, Idaho, 1966. 

thecivilwarparlor:

Soldier’s Music

When soldiers North and South marched off to war, they took with them a love of song that transcended the political and philosophical divide between them. Music passed the time; it entertained and comforted; it brought back memories of home and family; it strengthened the bonds between comrades and helped to forge new ones. And, in the case of the Confederacy, it helped create the sense of national identity and unity so necessary to a fledgling nation. 

Bernard writes, “In camp and hospital they sang — sentimental songs and ballads, comic songs and patriotic numbers….The songs were better than rations or medicine.” By Bernard’s count, “…during the first year [of the war] alone, an estimated two thousand compositions were produced, and by the end of the war more music had been created, played, and sung than during all our other wars combined. More of the music of the era has endured than from any other period in our history.” 

Photo Library of Congress

http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/on-the-homefront/culture/music/music.html

Bernard, Kenneth A., Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War, Caxton Printers, Caldwell, Idaho, 1966. 



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thecivilwarparlor:

The Memoirs Of General Ulysses S. Grant
Mark Twain approached Grant about publishing the war hero’s memoirs with a plum deal that would give Grant 75 percent of the profits as royalties.
Cash-strapped Grant had little choice but to accept Twain’s offer, and the Civil War-focused “Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant” hit stores in 1885.
Grant’s memoirs were an instant runaway hit. Twain’s company made the clever choice of employing former Union soldiers in full uniform as salesmen, and the book became one of the best sellers of the 19th century.
Today, the book is considered by many to be the best presidential memoir ever written, but there’s some controversy over who actually did the bulk of the writing. Twain always claimed that he had only made slight edits to Grant’s text, but the prose was so strong that many suspected Twain himself had ghostwritten the book.
Sadly, Grant didn’t get to see the success of his book; he died shortly after its completion. But his widow Julia banked over $400,000 in royalties from the memoir.
Photo By Alexander Gardner , Mammoth-Plate Albumen Print Circa 1865
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ulysses_S_Grant_by_Gardner,_c1865.jpg
http://www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/09/20/mf.history.of.presidential.memoirs/

thecivilwarparlor:

The Memoirs Of General Ulysses S. Grant

Mark Twain approached Grant about publishing the war hero’s memoirs with a plum deal that would give Grant 75 percent of the profits as royalties.

Cash-strapped Grant had little choice but to accept Twain’s offer, and the Civil War-focused “Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant” hit stores in 1885.

Grant’s memoirs were an instant runaway hit. Twain’s company made the clever choice of employing former Union soldiers in full uniform as salesmen, and the book became one of the best sellers of the 19th century.

Today, the book is considered by many to be the best presidential memoir ever written, but there’s some controversy over who actually did the bulk of the writing. Twain always claimed that he had only made slight edits to Grant’s text, but the prose was so strong that many suspected Twain himself had ghostwritten the book.

Sadly, Grant didn’t get to see the success of his book; he died shortly after its completion. But his widow Julia banked over $400,000 in royalties from the memoir.

Photo By Alexander Gardner , Mammoth-Plate Albumen Print Circa 1865

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ulysses_S_Grant_by_Gardner,_c1865.jpg

http://www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/09/20/mf.history.of.presidential.memoirs/



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"In my feeble estimation, General McClellan, with all his laurels, sinks into insignificance beside the true heroine of the age, the angel of the battlefield."Dr. James DunnSurgeon at the Battle of Antietam


With the outbreak of war and the cascade of wounded Union soldiers into Washington, Miss Barton quickly recognized the unpreparedness of the Army Medical Department. For nearly a year, she lobbied the Army bureaucracy in vain to bring her own medical supplies to the battlefields. Finally, with the help of sympathetic U. S. Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts, Miss Barton was permitted to bring her supplies to the battlefield. Her self-appointed military duties brought her to some of the ugliest battlefields of 1862—Cedar Mountain, Va., Second Manassas, Va., Antietam, Md., and Fredericksburg, Va.


 "I may sometimes be willing to teach for nothing, but if paid at all, I shall never do a man’s work for less than a man’s pay." Clara Barton


http://slowbuddy.com/quotes/25-outstanding-past-quotes/

thecivilwarparlor:

"In my feeble estimation, General McClellan, with all his laurels, sinks into insignificance beside the true heroine of the age, the angel of the battlefield."

Dr. James Dunn


Surgeon at the Battle of Antietam

With the outbreak of war and the cascade of wounded Union soldiers into Washington, Miss Barton quickly recognized the unpreparedness of the Army Medical Department. For nearly a year, she lobbied the Army bureaucracy in vain to bring her own medical supplies to the battlefields. Finally, with the help of sympathetic U. S. Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts, Miss Barton was permitted to bring her supplies to the battlefield. Her self-appointed military duties brought her to some of the ugliest battlefields of 1862—Cedar Mountain, Va., Second Manassas, Va., Antietam, Md., and Fredericksburg, Va.

 "I may sometimes be willing to teach for nothing, but if paid at all, I shall never do a man’s work for less than a man’s pay." Clara Barton

http://slowbuddy.com/quotes/25-outstanding-past-quotes/



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thecivilwarparlor:

A British Volunteer That Joined The Fight In America’s Civil War- The Battle Of Chancellorsville 
One man caught up in the carnage was Henry George Hore, an ordinary bank clerk from Sussex who had sailed to the U.S. in April to join the Northern army. He was appalled as he watched the mounting fatalities. 
‘Good God, my dear girl, it was awful,’ he wrote to his cousin, Olivia, back home in England. ‘The dead seemed piled heaps upon heaps.’
That day Hore killed a man for the first time. It was a Southerner whom he had seen plunge a sword into the chest of one of his close friends. 
‘Killing him did not take 30 seconds. I sighted him along the barrel of my revolver and if I had not killed him the first time would have shot him again.’
Why Would The English Want To Fight In An American War? $
There were more than three million British immigrants living in the U.S. at the time — despite the fact that a bitter Anglophobia rooted in British colonial rule almost 100 years earlier was still widespread.

And at home, not only was slavery a deeply emotive political topic since being abolished in England three decades earlier, but so, too, was cotton. The livelihoods of 900,000 workers — nearly one in five of the entire national workforce — depended in one way or another on cotton from the Southern states.

The result was that thousands of ­Britons disobeyed the Government’s neutrality injunction to volunteer for either the Federal or Confederate army — anti-slavery protesters and mercenaries, in the main, joined the North. Idealists who saw the ‘plucky’ Southern states as the underdog fighting for justifiable independence, along with soldiers of fortune, signed up with the South.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1330735/Thousands-British-volunteers-gave-lives-Americas-civil-war.html#ixzz2lzvk6gvJ 

thecivilwarparlor:

A British Volunteer That Joined The Fight In America’s Civil War- The Battle Of Chancellorsville 

One man caught up in the carnage was Henry George Hore, an ordinary bank clerk from Sussex who had sailed to the U.S. in April to join the Northern army. He was appalled as he watched the mounting fatalities. 

‘Good God, my dear girl, it was awful,’ he wrote to his cousin, Olivia, back home in England. ‘The dead seemed piled heaps upon heaps.’

That day Hore killed a man for the first time. It was a Southerner whom he had seen plunge a sword into the chest of one of his close friends. 

‘Killing him did not take 30 seconds. I sighted him along the barrel of my revolver and if I had not killed him the first time would have shot him again.’

Why Would The English Want To Fight In An American War? $

There were more than three million British immigrants living in the U.S. at the time — despite the fact that a bitter Anglophobia rooted in British colonial rule almost 100 years earlier was still widespread.

And at home, not only was slavery a deeply emotive political topic since being abolished in England three decades earlier, but so, too, was cotton. The livelihoods of 900,000 workers — nearly one in five of the entire national workforce — depended in one way or another on cotton from the Southern states.

The result was that thousands of ­Britons disobeyed the Government’s neutrality injunction to volunteer for either the Federal or Confederate army — anti-slavery protesters and mercenaries, in the main, joined the North. Idealists who saw the ‘plucky’ Southern states as the underdog fighting for justifiable independence, along with soldiers of fortune, signed up with the South.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1330735/Thousands-British-volunteers-gave-lives-Americas-civil-war.html#ixzz2lzvk6gvJ 





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thecivilwarparlor:

Confederate Envoys Reached London, And Many Englishmen Remained Susceptible To The Southern Claim.

English politicians, like the radical John Bright and the Whig Duke of Argyll, ardently supported the North, plenty sided with the Confederacy. They even included W. E. Gladstone, on his long journey from youthful Tory to “the people’s William,” adored by the masses in his later years. Apart from sympathy with the underdog, many Englishmen believed that the South had a just claim of national self-determination.

The American population claims ancestry from British immigrants, great numbers of them arriving throughout the 19th century. Plenty of those took part in the war, and they were joined by more volunteers who came just for the fight, on one side or the other. The extraordinary cast portrayed in “A World on Fire,” by Amanda Foreman — who is also the author of “Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire” — extends from men who fled England to escape poverty to aristocratic Union officers like Major John Fitzroy de Courcy, later Lord Kingsale, a veteran of the Crimea, not to mention Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, a soldier of fortune whose knighthood was actually Italian. Some, like the Welshman Henry Morton Stanley, even managed to fight for both sides.

“A World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War,” by Amanda Foreman,  http://www.amazon.com/World-Fire-Britains-Crucial-American/dp/0375756965

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/03/books/review/book-review-a-world-on-fire-by-amanda-foreman.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0



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thecivilwarparlor:

Baseball And The American Civil War
The Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York was the first organized baseball club. 1859 Photo: Knickerkbocker Baseball Club and Excelsior Base Ball Club
The club first started play in 1842 (playing in Manhattan), but it was not until 1845 that the club formally organized.
The American Civil War was actually a boon for the fledgling sport of base ball (so described as two words in most publications until the change to a single word somewhere between 1910 and 1930).  Although the NABBP was founded by clubs from the New York City area, base ball was being played in the north and the south during the War Between the States.  The movements of soldiers over great distances, as well as the exchange of prisoners, helped spread the game’s rules and style of play over a wide area of the country and among men from a variety of cultural backgrounds.  The game provided soldiers with a means of escape from the hardships of war, and in so doing, a foundation was planted for the sport to become America’s pastime.  The sport allowed a further kinship to be developed between the men, the importance of teamwork was accentuated, and the boosts in morale that the game afforded helped to weave the game of base ball into the lives of Civil War soldiers. 
A private in the 10thMassachusetts wrote:
“The parade ground has been a busy place for a week or so past, ball-playing having become a mania in camp.  Officer and men forget, for a time, the differences in rank and indulge in the invigorating sport with a schoolboy’s ardor.” 
http://lovewarandbaseball.blogspot.com/2010/10/baseball-and-civil-war.html
http://www.ohiocivilwar150.org/2012/04/the-game-of-baseball-before-during-and-after-the-civil-war/

thecivilwarparlor:

Baseball And The American Civil War

The Knickerbocker Base Ball Club of New York was the first organized baseball club. 1859 Photo: Knickerkbocker Baseball Club and Excelsior Base Ball Club

The club first started play in 1842 (playing in Manhattan), but it was not until 1845 that the club formally organized.

The American Civil War was actually a boon for the fledgling sport of base ball (so described as two words in most publications until the change to a single word somewhere between 1910 and 1930).  Although the NABBP was founded by clubs from the New York City area, base ball was being played in the north and the south during the War Between the States.  The movements of soldiers over great distances, as well as the exchange of prisoners, helped spread the game’s rules and style of play over a wide area of the country and among men from a variety of cultural backgrounds.  The game provided soldiers with a means of escape from the hardships of war, and in so doing, a foundation was planted for the sport to become America’s pastime.  The sport allowed a further kinship to be developed between the men, the importance of teamwork was accentuated, and the boosts in morale that the game afforded helped to weave the game of base ball into the lives of Civil War soldiers. 

A private in the 10thMassachusetts wrote:

“The parade ground has been a busy place for a week or so past, ball-playing having become a mania in camp.  Officer and men forget, for a time, the differences in rank and indulge in the invigorating sport with a schoolboy’s ardor.” 

http://lovewarandbaseball.blogspot.com/2010/10/baseball-and-civil-war.html

http://www.ohiocivilwar150.org/2012/04/the-game-of-baseball-before-during-and-after-the-civil-war/



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thecivilwarparlor:

California Joe- (PVT Truman Head)-

Company C First Regiment Berdan’s Sharpshooters

Almost as famous as Hiram Berdan himself, Truman Head of Company C of the First Regiment was unquestionably the most famous among Berdan’s Sharpshooters. Nicknamed “California Joe”, “Old Californy”, and “Old California,” Joe came west from New York to seek his fortune after a failed romance. Joe was 52 years old at the time he enlisted, but stated his age as 42, otherwise he would have been rejected. Joe brought to the sharpshooters a background of a hunter and gold miner which could have made enough fodder for interesting news stories but Joe was found to have a keen eye and a great marksman without any embellishments by the press. Joe’s image and his exploits made for good reading in a time where the Union was sorely lacking heroes and good news from the war.

One of the greatest impacts Joe had on the Sharpshooters themselves was his private purchase of a Sharps rifle. It may have been Joes experience that made them want their own Sharps’ as well. Sadly, Joe’s time in the sharpshooters was quite limited. His age caught up with him and his sight was starting to fail him. Joe was discharged November 4,1862 for “senility and impaired vision.” Joe returned to California and became a customs inspector in San Francisco. He died November 24,1874.

http://www.1stussharpshooters.com/oldcompanyc.html



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thecivilwarparlor:

Death And The American Civil War~ “We all have our dead–we all have our Graves”
For those Americans who lived in and through the Civil War, the texture of the experience, its warp and woof, was the presence of death. At war’s end this shared suffering would override persisting differences about the meanings of race, citizenship, and nationhood to establish sacrifice and its memorialization as the ground on which North and South would ultimately reunite. Even in our own time this fundamentally elegiac understanding of the Civil War retains a powerful hold -
Mortality defines the human condition. “We all have our dead–we all have our Graves,” a Confederate Episcopal bishop observed in an 1862 sermon. Every era, he explained, must confront “like miseries”; every age must search for “like consolation.” Yet death has its discontinuities as well. Men and women approach death in ways shaped by history, by culture, by conditions that vary over time and across space. Even though “we all have our dead,” and even though we all die, we do so differently from generation to generation and from place to place -
Americans had to identify–find, invent, create–the means and mechanisms to manage more than half a million dead. The work of death was Civil War America’s most fundamental and most demanding undertaking. - 
See more at: http://hnn.us/article/86584#sthash.eowKpJVy.dpuf This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, from which the above is excerpted - See more at: http://hnn.us/article/86584#sthash.QSA6ICRp.dpuf

thecivilwarparlor:

Death And The American Civil War~ “We all have our dead–we all have our Graves”

For those Americans who lived in and through the Civil War, the texture of the experience, its warp and woof, was the presence of death. At war’s end this shared suffering would override persisting differences about the meanings of race, citizenship, and nationhood to establish sacrifice and its memorialization as the ground on which North and South would ultimately reunite. Even in our own time this fundamentally elegiac understanding of the Civil War retains a powerful hold -

Mortality defines the human condition. “We all have our dead–we all have our Graves,” a Confederate Episcopal bishop observed in an 1862 sermon. Every era, he explained, must confront “like miseries”; every age must search for “like consolation.” Yet death has its discontinuities as well. Men and women approach death in ways shaped by history, by culture, by conditions that vary over time and across space. Even though “we all have our dead,” and even though we all die, we do so differently from generation to generation and from place to place -

Americans had to identify–find, invent, create–the means and mechanisms to manage more than half a million dead. The work of death was Civil War America’s most fundamental and most demanding undertaking. -

See more at: http://hnn.us/article/86584#sthash.eowKpJVy.dpuf This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, from which the above is excerpted - See more at: http://hnn.us/article/86584#sthash.QSA6ICRp.dpuf



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thecivilwarparlor:

Soldier In Union Army Sergeant Uniform 1864

1,764 men of color served Connecticut during the Civil War between 1863 and 1867. The level of black participation in Connecticut regiments was astounding considering that the 1860 census revealed only 8,726 blacks living in the state; of them only 2,206 were men between the ages of 15 and 50 (the most likely ages for service). This meant that some 78% of eligible black men enlisted. Just over 15% of these men died as a result of the war. -
Black and white carte de visite of a black man dressed in a Union Army Sergeant uniform with sergeant stripes, long straight sword hung from belt, and left hand holding a copy of a book entitled “The Great Rebellion,” by Joel Tyler Headley. 10 cm x 7 cm. Photograph by J. Oldershaw, northeast corner of High and Asylum Streets, Hartford, Connecticut. Courtesy of the Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
See more at: http://connecticuthistory.org/connecticuts-black-civil-war-regiment/#sthash.FiTqDOav.dpuf  Photo Credit WIKI

"Colored" Federal troops, and their particular experiences, form one of the central threads of Paula’s tapestry in A Civil War Christmas.

thecivilwarparlor:

Soldier In Union Army Sergeant Uniform 1864

1,764 men of color served Connecticut during the Civil War between 1863 and 1867. The level of black participation in Connecticut regiments was astounding considering that the 1860 census revealed only 8,726 blacks living in the state; of them only 2,206 were men between the ages of 15 and 50 (the most likely ages for service). This meant that some 78% of eligible black men enlisted. Just over 15% of these men died as a result of the war. -

Black and white carte de visite of a black man dressed in a Union Army Sergeant uniform with sergeant stripes, long straight sword hung from belt, and left hand holding a copy of a book entitled “The Great Rebellion,” by Joel Tyler Headley. 10 cm x 7 cm. Photograph by J. Oldershaw, northeast corner of High and Asylum Streets, Hartford, Connecticut. Courtesy of the Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

See more at: http://connecticuthistory.org/connecticuts-black-civil-war-regiment/#sthash.FiTqDOav.dpuf  Photo Credit WIKI

"Colored" Federal troops, and their particular experiences, form one of the central threads of Paula’s tapestry in A Civil War Christmas.



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thecivilwarparlor:

Mosby’s Rangers
Mosby’s men never formally surrendered and were disbanded on April 21, 1865, almost two weeks after Lee had surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to Grant. On the last day of Mosby’s striking force, a letter from him was read aloud to his men:
Soldiers!I have summoned you together for the last time. The vision we have cherished of a free and independent country, has vanished, and that country is now the spoil of a conqueror. I disband your organization in preference to surrendering it to our enemies. I am no longer your commander. After association of more than two eventful years, I part from you with a just pride, in the fame of your achievements, and grateful recollections of your generous kindness to myself. And now at this moment of bidding you a final adieu accept the assurance of my unchanging confidence and regard.Farewell. John S. Mosby, Col.Wert, Jeffry D., Mosby’s Rangers, Simon and Schuster, 1991

Mosby & his men of course play a vital, if offstage, role in our play.

thecivilwarparlor:

Mosby’s Rangers

Mosby’s men never formally surrendered and were disbanded on April 21, 1865, almost two weeks after Lee had surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to Grant. On the last day of Mosby’s striking force, a letter from him was read aloud to his men:

Soldiers!I have summoned you together for the last time. The vision we have cherished of a free and independent country, has vanished, and that country is now the spoil of a conqueror. I disband your organization in preference to surrendering it to our enemies. I am no longer your commander. After association of more than two eventful years, I part from you with a just pride, in the fame of your achievements, and grateful recollections of your generous kindness to myself. And now at this moment of bidding you a final adieu accept the assurance of my unchanging confidence and regard.Farewell. John S. Mosby, Col.Wert, Jeffry D.Mosby’s Rangers, Simon and Schuster, 1991

Mosby & his men of course play a vital, if offstage, role in our play.



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