The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2013-2014 Season:
Animal Crackers
Dance of the Holy Ghosts
A Civil War Christmas
Stones in His Pockets
Twelfth Night
Vanya Sonya Masha and Spike
Wild with Happy
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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Anonymous said: How many dramaturgs does it take to screw in a lightbulb?

dramaturgytea:

Two - One to research everything about lightbulbs, the context of this lightbulb, ponder ‘why this lightbulb now?’, suggest edits for the lightbulb, investigate appropriate lightbulbs for the era, and finally screw the damn thing in. And one to casually mention that the lightbulb should actually be a candelabra.



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"Life without Mozart" - never gets old. AMADEUS coming Fall 2014, and also because.

"Life without Mozart" - never gets old. AMADEUS coming Fall 2014, and also because.



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smallwineglass:

Recently I’ve been trying to introduce more people to Flanders and Swann, the songs of which I grew up with, and I feel this particular one is the most fitting for a wine blog!

musical zeugma. lyrical syllepsis. heaven, whatever you call it.



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"Anarchists take over Center Stage"

A new version of ‘Animal Crackers’ opens Center Stage season
September 03, 2013|By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun

Anarchists have taken over Center Stage.

Not the bomb-throwing kind, but the quip-smacking, horn-honking, non-sequitur-spinning types known as the Marx Brothers.

Those indelible siblings — weirdly mustachioed Groucho, fake-Italian Chico, silent Harpo, straight man Zeppo — are being resurrected in an adaptation of “Animal Crackers” that opens the Center Stage season this week.

The original “Animal Crackers” was a 1928 Broadway musical that provided a typically nutty stage vehicle for the Marx Brothers and, two years later, an equally nutty film.

The plot, if it can be called one, revolves around wealthy Mrs. Rittenhouse (immortalized on stage and screen by uber-dowager Margaret Dumont) and a missing painting.

But the main focus is on three eccentric figures. The explorer Captain Spaulding is the Groucho role; the piano-paying Emanuel Ravelli is Chico’s assignment; and the Professor is the quintessential Harpo character, a guy in an overcoat who chases women but brakes for harps. (As usual, the role for Zeppo is less colorful.)

The Center Stage production will re-create a lot of shtick that will be familiar to fans of the movie, including the moment when a helpless butler (wonderfully named Hives) tries to open a folding table while Harpo does his best to thwart the process.

Helping to make such shtick stick is Paul Kalina, the show’s director of physical comedy. He has been working alongside stage director BJ Jones, who describes Kalina as having “nearly a Ph.D. in Marx Brothers.” An appreciation for the comic team may have been hereditary.

"My old man would skip school and take the train into Chicago to see their live shows when they were on tour," Kalina, 44, said. "And I kind of grew up with them. [Chicago TV station] WGN played a lot of their movies. I took to them and that whole era of comedy."

Kalina eventually discovered his calling at the Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre in California, where he honed his skills in the clown genre. “More in the line of Buster Keaton than Charlie Chaplin,” he said.

That led to Kalina becoming a founding member of a Chicago physical comedy troupe called 500 Clown (“You say ‘500 head of cattle,’ so we say ‘500 Clown’ “), inspired by the sense of anarchy that the Marx Brothers generated.

When Chicago’s Goodman Theatre staged “Animal Crackers” in 2009, adapted and directed by that company’s resident artistic associate, Henry Wishcamper, Kalina was brought in to ensure the right flavor of physical comedy. He performed the same service for a production of the Wishcamper version at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts this summer.

In Baltimore, Kalina has been reunited with two of the Williamstown actors, Brad Aldous as the Professor and Jonathan Brody as Ravelli, both making their Center Stage debuts.

In a recent rehearsal, Kalina worked with them on minute details in scenes involving such things as dropping tools in just the right way to make the correct amount of racket, and how to get perfectly tangled in a ladder.

"The physical part of this is so key," said Jones, the stage director. "You have to drill it and drill it and drill it."

In the case of the Groucho role, there’s not just the physical side to evoke — Groucho was wonderfully rubbery in the early years of the Marx Brothers — but the verbal one. His accent and way of phrasing are very much a part of the picture.

Stepping into Groucho’s aura and mustache for the Center Stage production is Bruce Randolph Nelson, a resident artist of Everyman Theatre making a return guest engagement. He did not come to the project as a lifelong Marx Brothers fan.

"I watched the ‘Animal Crackers’ movie and read books about Groucho to get a sense of what he was about," said Nelson, 46. "I watched video clips voraciously, starting with Groucho’s TV quiz show ‘You Bet Your Life.’ I marveled at his rapport and sense of improvisation on that show."

Unlike a typical play, this one is not so much about getting into character as it is getting into the character of the person who famously first portrayed that character.

"I wanted to get as close as I could get to imitating Groucho and then infuse my own sensibilities into the process," Nelson said. "What made the process so lovely in this production was that everyone realized I’ve got to be in there somewhere."

A perfect impersonation is not the goal of the production, anyway, especially since so many people still have clear memories of the Marx Brothers.

"You can’t live up to that," Jones, 62, said, "but you can live up to the spirit."

That spirit is totally, disarmingly zany. To spread that quality around, the “Animal Crackers” adaptation does not put all of the comic-engine weight on the actors in portraying Groucho, Chico and Harpo.


(Page 2 of 2)

A new version of ‘Animal Crackers’ opens Center Stage season

September 03, 2013|By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun

Most of the others in the cast get a chance to reveal their chops by taking on multiple roles. It’s a familiar device in the theater, used most memorably in recent years in the Broadway hit “The 39 Steps.” This “Animal Crackers” has 21 characters and something like 60 costume changes, but only nine actors in all. “It requires a virtuosic ensemble,” Kalina said.

Marx Brothers stage shows were notorious for improvisation and irreverence, qualities that tended to get somewhat defused in the movies.

"I read firsthand accounts of what was happening in theaters when they performed," Kalina said. "People thought they were crazy. They did wild things. They would strip their producer and wheel him onstage in a basket and make him run off. That’s why audiences loved them. There was an extreme sense of play. Nothing was sacred."

Some Marx Brothers business has not aged well. Captain Spaudling’s first appearance in “Animal Crackers,” for example, involved being carried in on a covered chair borne by African natives.

"That would be politically and socially incorrect today," Kalina said. "But we had to have a spectacular entrance for him. I created one."

It would also be unwise to preserve all of the original “Animal Crackers,” which was a long play even before the brothers inserted things (performances were known to run for four hours or so).

The adaptation that Center Stage is using trims a fair amount of material — “The plot is simplified; it gets right to the Marx Brothers’ madness,” Jones said — but keeps most of the original music. (The movie jettisoned several songs.)

It also strives to retain the authentic anarchic edge. This is no ordinary play with a clear-cut beginning, middle and end.

"What the Marx Brothers did in 1928 was a kind of performance art, when you think about it," Jones said. "People never knew what they were going to do. ‘Animal Crackers’ is more like two plays that collide and one takes over the other. It was an assault on theatrical structure."

Jones got turned on to the Marx Brothers as a college student after attending an all-night festival of their films in 1969, a time when anti-authority antics seemed newly relevant.

"The Marx Brothers were anarchists, and we all felt they would have joined us, in a comedic way, in smashing down walls," Jones said. "If we’re trying to re-create anything in ‘Animal Crackers,’ it’s the sense of being at the first Broadway performance and seeing the Marx Brothers suddenly break out. Once you’re on this ride, it’s fast and clear and brisk. And you stay on it for the giddy exuberance of it."

"Animal Crackers" runs through Oct. 13 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. Tickets are $19 to $59. Call 410-332-0033, or go to centerstage.org

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-09-03/entertainment/bs-ae-animal-crackers-preview-20130831_1_marx-brothers-margaret-dumont-center-stage-season



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All the Marx Brothers horrible secrets revealed in this probing 1993 expose: “The Unknown Marx Brothers.” Shocking.

(Source: youtube.com)



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"The Wisdom of Marx" provides about 8 minutes of Groucho Marx one-liners over production stills and other photos. Just try not chuckling during that 8 minutes…

(Source: youtube.com)



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"The One and Only Groucho," wonderful hour-long documentary on the bon-mot hurling anarchist of comedy. What a world to delve into as we rehearse the stage adaptation of Animal Crackers.

(Source: youtube.com)



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pretty much speaks for its Poe-self.

pretty much speaks for its Poe-self.

(Source: restlesslochness, via agilemindsfragilehearts)



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Pies or Plays?

For close to a baker’s dozen years now, fresh pie has been an integral part of the Humana Festival experience for a select group of attendees, most of them dramaturgs and literary managers from around the country. Midway through the new play marathon that the Festival offers, these intrepid scouts and critics and theatrical gastronomes pause to refresh themselves with an array of pies from Louisville’s inimitable Homeade Ice Cream and Pie Kitchen. Originally a small, guerilla venture off-campus in search of baked goods, the event has over the years become a formal part of the schedule, complete with not only two tables overflowing with filled treats but also what can only be termed Pie-a-turgy. This year’s lobby display offered the following expert exigesis from the wits and wags in the Literary Office of Actors Theater:

I interview Bakers
Q: What are you working on now?

A: An adaptation, or perhaps, a willful misinterpretation of the classic Apple Pie. One that addresses the labor injustices hidden by the high gloss and low cost of your lunch-box Fuji.

Q: Tell me a story from your childhood that explains who you are as a baker.

A: I grew up in a small town and didn’t have TV. To top it off, my parents weren’t into fast food of any kind, so if I wanted a sweet treat, I had to make it myself. A lot of those first attempts were soupy and kind of a mish-mash of ingredients, but I loved it. and my family always pretended to enjoy my half-cooked creations.

Q: If you could change one thing about baking…?

A: More people should eat things that aren’t pre-baked or shrink-wrapped (both of which are fine by the way, but come on. Enough.)

Q: What advice do you have for bakers just starting out?

A: Share your pies. Get a group of friends together, wherever, in the kitchen, a basement, wherever. Bake pies. Share pies. 
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A recent surge in pastry-education has cultivated new interest in pie-baking, but few institutions can support this trend. “In terms of encouraging new bakers, serving new pies, and sending our pies out to other bakeries, we won’t be able to do what we hoped.” —Pastry Master at the Guthrie.

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One of our most respected bakers was quoted in the new York Times saying, “New pie development is dead. It just became too expensive to bake new pies. Today, instead of 50 regional bakeries developing 50 new pies, what you have is one new pie by an established baker that gets served 50 times at 50 regional bakeries.”

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Most patrons are only interested in traditional or holiday pies. They want the pie they grew up on. They think they won’t like new pies, or that they’d rather eat a donut or some other desert-on demand. And maybe the only way to preserve the art of pie-making is to evolve. Is to reach out to this new generation that grew up with gluten intolerance and iPhones.

-Spokesperson for the LMDA (Lard Mixers and Dough-rollers of the Americas

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The Shape of Pies to Come:

A baker, as any other food artist, should accept the bald fact that content determines form and form determines content. A crust is not something that gets in the way of the culinary experience but is an integral part of the pie.

Bakers are often encouraged to stick to a traditional, two crust, closed-top pie structure with the filling inside. Those sorts of pies are fine, but we should understand that the pie crust is not merely a docile, decoratively latticed pastry, but an active ingredient in the sort of taste experience which ultimately inhabits it.

Why a closed top pie crust? Why a crust at all? If a baker chooses to invoke the taste of time immemorial enclosed in a pair of parentheses, then the pie naturally assumes a new shape. Emerging bakers must find the pastry form that fits the equation of their filling.



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Fun with White Privilege, as we get ready to start rehearsals Monday for #CSRaisin. That would be rep cast productions of Norris’ CLYBOURNE PARK and Kwei-Armah’s brand new BENEATHA’S PLACE, both alternative responses in conversation with Hansberrry’s gorgeous original classic, RAISIN IN THE SUN. So there.

Fun with White Privilege, as we get ready to start rehearsals Monday for #CSRaisin. That would be rep cast productions of Norris’ CLYBOURNE PARK and Kwei-Armah’s brand new BENEATHA’S PLACE, both alternative responses in conversation with Hansberrry’s gorgeous original classic, RAISIN IN THE SUN. So there.



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