The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2013-2014 Season:
Animal Crackers
Dance of the Holy Ghosts
A Civil War Christmas
Stones in His Pockets
Twelfth Night
Vanya Sonya Masha and Spike
Wild with Happy
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

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thecivilwarparlor:

Soldier In Union Army Sergeant Uniform 1864

1,764 men of color served Connecticut during the Civil War between 1863 and 1867. The level of black participation in Connecticut regiments was astounding considering that the 1860 census revealed only 8,726 blacks living in the state; of them only 2,206 were men between the ages of 15 and 50 (the most likely ages for service). This meant that some 78% of eligible black men enlisted. Just over 15% of these men died as a result of the war. -
Black and white carte de visite of a black man dressed in a Union Army Sergeant uniform with sergeant stripes, long straight sword hung from belt, and left hand holding a copy of a book entitled “The Great Rebellion,” by Joel Tyler Headley. 10 cm x 7 cm. Photograph by J. Oldershaw, northeast corner of High and Asylum Streets, Hartford, Connecticut. Courtesy of the Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
See more at: http://connecticuthistory.org/connecticuts-black-civil-war-regiment/#sthash.FiTqDOav.dpuf  Photo Credit WIKI

"Colored" Federal troops, and their particular experiences, form one of the central threads of Paula’s tapestry in A Civil War Christmas.

thecivilwarparlor:

Soldier In Union Army Sergeant Uniform 1864

1,764 men of color served Connecticut during the Civil War between 1863 and 1867. The level of black participation in Connecticut regiments was astounding considering that the 1860 census revealed only 8,726 blacks living in the state; of them only 2,206 were men between the ages of 15 and 50 (the most likely ages for service). This meant that some 78% of eligible black men enlisted. Just over 15% of these men died as a result of the war. -

Black and white carte de visite of a black man dressed in a Union Army Sergeant uniform with sergeant stripes, long straight sword hung from belt, and left hand holding a copy of a book entitled “The Great Rebellion,” by Joel Tyler Headley. 10 cm x 7 cm. Photograph by J. Oldershaw, northeast corner of High and Asylum Streets, Hartford, Connecticut. Courtesy of the Yale Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

See more at: http://connecticuthistory.org/connecticuts-black-civil-war-regiment/#sthash.FiTqDOav.dpuf  Photo Credit WIKI

"Colored" Federal troops, and their particular experiences, form one of the central threads of Paula’s tapestry in A Civil War Christmas.



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One of the many and varied volumes available at the online bookstore of Marine Parents online, a few of which we’re going to feature here. We’ve also noted other resources—books, articles, websites, merely a scratching of the surface of a vast array available in many media—on our delicious thread. Just follow the Reentry tag. If anyone following or stopping by would like to recommend other works, drop a note and we’ll include them, willingly.     
That said, one aside: for anyone who doesn’t know the play ReEntry (yet!), but maybe is considering seeing it—and you should, if you’re anywhere nearby—don’t get the impression from some of these materials that it’s all about PTSD, TBI, and war damage. These come up in the conversation that makes up the play, because it’s based directly on interviews with a range of Marines, some of whom are wounded in various ways; but by no means does the topic dominate the play. These are facets of the larger inquiry into “reentry” covered in the show, from many perspectives. 

One of the many and varied volumes available at the online bookstore of Marine Parents online, a few of which we’re going to feature here. We’ve also noted other resources—books, articles, websites, merely a scratching of the surface of a vast array available in many media—on our delicious thread. Just follow the Reentry tag. If anyone following or stopping by would like to recommend other works, drop a note and we’ll include them, willingly.     

That said, one aside: for anyone who doesn’t know the play ReEntry (yet!), but maybe is considering seeing it—and you should, if you’re anywhere nearby—don’t get the impression from some of these materials that it’s all about PTSD, TBI, and war damage. These come up in the conversation that makes up the play, because it’s based directly on interviews with a range of Marines, some of whom are wounded in various ways; but by no means does the topic dominate the play. These are facets of the larger inquiry into “reentry” covered in the show, from many perspectives. 



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Tags | Reentry | soldiers | Marines | ptsd

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We have seen…how necessary it is for a prince to have his foundations well laid, otherwise it follows of necessity he will go to ruin. The chief foundations of all states, new as well as old or composite, are good laws and good arms; and as there cannot be good laws where the state is not well armed, it follows that where they are well armed they have good laws. I shall leave the laws out of the discussion and shall speak of the arms.

I say, therefore, that the arms with which a prince defends his state are either his own, or they are mercenaries, auxiliaries, or mixed. Mercenaries and auxiliaries are useless and dangerous; and if one holds his state based on these arms, he will stand neither firm nor safe; for they are disunited, ambitious and without discipline, unfaithful, valiant before friends, cowardly before enemies; they have neither the fear of God nor fidelity to men, and destruction is deferred only so long as the attack is; for in peace one is robbed by them, and in war by the enemy.

Machiavelli, The Prince  

Machiavelli



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Out of every one hundred men you send us,
Ten should not even be here,
Eighty are nothing but targets.
Nine are the real fighters,
and we are lucky to have them, for
they the battle make.
Ah, but the one, one is a Warrior,
And he will bring the others back.
Heraclitus


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