The Thaumaturgy Department

(It's dramaturgy, not thaumaturgy.)

Gavin
CENTERSTAGE
Baltimore
Maryland
USA

thaumaturg
Main Entry: thau·ma·turg
Pronunciation: \ˈthȯ-mə-ˌtərj\
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from New Latin thaumaturgus, from Greek thaumatourgos working miracles, from thaumat-, thauma miracle + ergon work — more at Theater, Work

2014-2015 Season:
Amadeus
Next to Normal
It's A Wonderful Life
One Night in Miami
Herzog Rep
After the Revolution
4000 Miles
Marley
Play Labs

The official blog of the Dramaturgy Department at Baltimore's CENTERSTAGE. For posts related to our current and upcoming shows, click the links to the right. Alternatively, you could begin at the beginning, and explore our posts in chronological order.

-----------------------------------------


thecivilwarparlor:

A British Volunteer That Joined The Fight In America’s Civil War- The Battle Of Chancellorsville 
One man caught up in the carnage was Henry George Hore, an ordinary bank clerk from Sussex who had sailed to the U.S. in April to join the Northern army. He was appalled as he watched the mounting fatalities. 
‘Good God, my dear girl, it was awful,’ he wrote to his cousin, Olivia, back home in England. ‘The dead seemed piled heaps upon heaps.’
That day Hore killed a man for the first time. It was a Southerner whom he had seen plunge a sword into the chest of one of his close friends. 
‘Killing him did not take 30 seconds. I sighted him along the barrel of my revolver and if I had not killed him the first time would have shot him again.’
Why Would The English Want To Fight In An American War? $
There were more than three million British immigrants living in the U.S. at the time — despite the fact that a bitter Anglophobia rooted in British colonial rule almost 100 years earlier was still widespread.

And at home, not only was slavery a deeply emotive political topic since being abolished in England three decades earlier, but so, too, was cotton. The livelihoods of 900,000 workers — nearly one in five of the entire national workforce — depended in one way or another on cotton from the Southern states.

The result was that thousands of ­Britons disobeyed the Government’s neutrality injunction to volunteer for either the Federal or Confederate army — anti-slavery protesters and mercenaries, in the main, joined the North. Idealists who saw the ‘plucky’ Southern states as the underdog fighting for justifiable independence, along with soldiers of fortune, signed up with the South.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1330735/Thousands-British-volunteers-gave-lives-Americas-civil-war.html#ixzz2lzvk6gvJ 

thecivilwarparlor:

A British Volunteer That Joined The Fight In America’s Civil War- The Battle Of Chancellorsville 

One man caught up in the carnage was Henry George Hore, an ordinary bank clerk from Sussex who had sailed to the U.S. in April to join the Northern army. He was appalled as he watched the mounting fatalities. 

‘Good God, my dear girl, it was awful,’ he wrote to his cousin, Olivia, back home in England. ‘The dead seemed piled heaps upon heaps.’

That day Hore killed a man for the first time. It was a Southerner whom he had seen plunge a sword into the chest of one of his close friends. 

‘Killing him did not take 30 seconds. I sighted him along the barrel of my revolver and if I had not killed him the first time would have shot him again.’

Why Would The English Want To Fight In An American War? $

There were more than three million British immigrants living in the U.S. at the time — despite the fact that a bitter Anglophobia rooted in British colonial rule almost 100 years earlier was still widespread.

And at home, not only was slavery a deeply emotive political topic since being abolished in England three decades earlier, but so, too, was cotton. The livelihoods of 900,000 workers — nearly one in five of the entire national workforce — depended in one way or another on cotton from the Southern states.

The result was that thousands of ­Britons disobeyed the Government’s neutrality injunction to volunteer for either the Federal or Confederate army — anti-slavery protesters and mercenaries, in the main, joined the North. Idealists who saw the ‘plucky’ Southern states as the underdog fighting for justifiable independence, along with soldiers of fortune, signed up with the South.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1330735/Thousands-British-volunteers-gave-lives-Americas-civil-war.html#ixzz2lzvk6gvJ 





Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share

thecivilwarparlor:

Confederate Envoys Reached London, And Many Englishmen Remained Susceptible To The Southern Claim.

English politicians, like the radical John Bright and the Whig Duke of Argyll, ardently supported the North, plenty sided with the Confederacy. They even included W. E. Gladstone, on his long journey from youthful Tory to “the people’s William,” adored by the masses in his later years. Apart from sympathy with the underdog, many Englishmen believed that the South had a just claim of national self-determination.

The American population claims ancestry from British immigrants, great numbers of them arriving throughout the 19th century. Plenty of those took part in the war, and they were joined by more volunteers who came just for the fight, on one side or the other. The extraordinary cast portrayed in “A World on Fire,” by Amanda Foreman — who is also the author of “Georgiana: Duchess of Devonshire” — extends from men who fled England to escape poverty to aristocratic Union officers like Major John Fitzroy de Courcy, later Lord Kingsale, a veteran of the Crimea, not to mention Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, a soldier of fortune whose knighthood was actually Italian. Some, like the Welshman Henry Morton Stanley, even managed to fight for both sides.

“A World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War,” by Amanda Foreman,  http://www.amazon.com/World-Fire-Britains-Crucial-American/dp/0375756965

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/03/books/review/book-review-a-world-on-fire-by-amanda-foreman.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share
How the British Nearly Supported the Confederacy

Book Review - A World on Fire - By Amanda Foreman - NYTimes.com

By GEOFFREY WHEATCROFT



Comments (View)

Bookmark and Share